For those that don’t know what Twitter is, it’s a really good way of keeping up-to-date with people, companies and basically anyone with a Twitter account.

Basic Jargon

Tweet – a short message posted by a Twitter user.  Limited to 140 characters.  It’s public and viewable by everyone (unless you choose to make your Tweets private)
Retweet – A Tweet repeated by another Twitter user.
Hashtag – a keyword within a Tweet.  It’s created by prefixing a word with a # symbol e.g #android.  Searching for a hashtag will bring up all the Tweets which contain that word
Mention – if someone mentions your Twitter account in their Tweet.  To mention you prefix the username with an @ symbol e.g. @mihtcdesire.

How does it work?

  1. You sign-up on Twitter for a free account
  2. You find the people you’re interested in
  3. You press the follow button on their profile
  4. Plus you can post your own Tweets too, so your followers will find out any updates you have to share.

That’s it.  You just view your Twitter page and whenever someone you’re following posts a Tweet it’ll appear on that page.

For HTC Desire Owners

Of course as a HTC Desire owner, your phone plays very nicely with Twitter.  It comes with the “Peep” application.  You can use this to sign into your Twitter account, and whenever someone you follow posts a message you’ll be notified pretty quickly.  You can reply to messages, or retweet something you want to share with your own followers.  If you’re not fond of Peep, there’s alternatives in the Market including Google’s official Twitter app (called Twitter), Seesmic, Touiteur and so on.

Why Use Twitter?

  1. Fresh information – as soon as something major happens that you’re interested in, you’ll find out very quickly
    For example, if you’re following the MiHTCDesire Twitter account, then you’ll know within minutes whenever there’s a new blog article
  2. It’s simple – as explained above, it’s really simple and easy to use.  To be honest, I’d never used Twitter until starting this website, but when I did use it I found it so easy to share news, ask readers questions or even forward on questions I couldn’t answer personally to get replies from other Desire owners.
  3. It’s relevant – you choose the people you follow.  Before following them you can check their profile page to see the kind of tweets they post.
    For example, MiHTCDesire is dedicated to the HTC Desire so I’ll post Tweets that are solely related to that.  I know the last week saw a few big tech headlines such as the new Xbox 360 Slim, and the release of iOS4 but of course that’s not the focus of that Twitter account so it wasn’t posted.
  4. Plenty of people to follow – a lot of people, and even massive companies have a Twitter account which they keep up to do with the latest news and info.  Some even offer special promotions via Twitter.
    For example, HTC, Vodafone, O2 and even Google have their own Twitter account
  5. It’s concise (and generally precise) – for each update Twitter restrict you to 140 characters to write your message.  That means no ramblings or long-winded essays which could easily be condensed into a much shorter for example “Use Twitter, it’s awesome”.
  6. More information – A lot of people, (myself included) will post more stuff on Twitter than on a dedicated website just for convenience.
    For example: when I hear about a new application it’s quick and easy to write a few words about it on Twitter and share with everyone.   For that kind of thing it’s not exactly worth writing a whole new article.  Plus I hate writing long pieces on my phone and only blog from my computer, whereas a Twitter update is much similar to just writing a simple text message.

Drawbacks

The main drawback of Twitter I’ve found is some of the mundane things that people post.  On my personal account, I follow a web designer who sometimes tweets links to excellent web-related articles and news that he comes across, which I find really useful for my work.  Unfortunately a lot of the time he only posts really petty updates about his life “Picked a snot today, stretched at least 35mm”.

Conclusion (in 140 characters)

Twitter is a great way of getting the latest info. It’s like a custom newspaper, but the headlines only. Plus it plays nice with the Desire.

Yesterday I posted how to root your HTC Desire, which was the first method made available by Paul @ Modaco.  Today he’s created a new method which is much easier.

Note:

  1. I take no responsibility for anything that might go wrong. You do this at your own risk
  2. This method will wipe your phone completely – so backup everything using either SMS Backup Restore/ Call Log Backup Restore / MyBackup Pro / Sprite Backup or any other backup apps available in the market
  3. You need a microSD card to create a goldcard as per the instructions.  At the end of it you won’t be able to use that SD card as a normal memory card.  Don’t use your primary SD card, use a spare, smaller card – even 1GB should suffice
  4. Any problems either post here, in the original Modaco thread (linked above)

Skip to the rooting method

Read this whole topic – it contains a ton of useful information as well as the instructions and downloads!


Remember that if you use this guide, you do so entirely at your own risk!

Welcome to my guide on how to root the HTC Desire!

Compatibility

This guide will allow you to root your HTC Desire, provided it has a bootloader version of 0.75 or below. To check this, turn off your device, then turn it back on with the ‘back’ key held. On the second line in green text you will see HBOOT- and then a number. Provided this is 0.75 or below, this guide should work for you.

O2 Germany devices are currently shipping with a 0.80 bootloader, and as such cannot be rooted using this guide at this time.

Desire rooting protection

Back in the early days of Android, rooting was easy. You had several options – you could flash stuff via the bootloader, you could flash an engineering bootloader, you could use kernel exploits – there were many ways of getting the low level access to your device that – in fairness – I think we as paying customers are entitled to. As time has progressed however, the manufacturers have made things harder and harder. The Desire is not a straightforward phone to root, for many reasons, including…

  • a ‘perfected bootloader’ that doesn’t allow flashing or booting of any images (even HTC signed ones)
  • a RUU flash process that does not allow downgrading of the bootloader to earlier versions
  • a kernel (that as yet does not have publicly available source) that as yet has no known exploits
  • a new protection method previously seen on the HTC Tattoo that protects key partitions from having write access. Even with SU access, it is not possible to write to the boot, recovery or system partitions.

In reality, the options for rooting a device this secure are limited. Even if a kernel exploit were found, the key partitions would still be unwritable, rendering su access useless. This was circumvented on the Tattoo very cleverly, using a specific memory address from a confidential Qualcomm datasheet, however this information is not yet available for the Snapdragon chipset used in the Desire (and indeed may never enter the public domain).

And so the root process becomes a process of methodically probing every possible point of exposure on the device, looking for the slightest chink in the armour. I found one and we’re putting it to good use! The downside is that it’s not as easy or as pretty as rooting a device that is actually DESIGNED to be accessible at the lowest level, such as the Nexus One.

Shame on you HTC for going to such unnecessary lengths (but that’s another story for another day).

What this root process provides and does not provide

The root process will…

  • flash your device with a new, generic 1.15.405.4 based ROM that has Superuser access
  • show you how to enter the recovery image in future, allowing you to flash update zips

The root process will NOT…

  • enable you to flash your device with a custom recovery image that can be launched easily by just holding down the volume down button when powering on
  • enable you to have write access to the /system partition in normal use of the device

Both of these limitations are being worked on of course.

Pre-requisites

In order to complete this guide, you need the following…

  • a HTC Desire
  • a PC
  • a microUSB cable
  • a microSD card (to be made into a ‘goldcard’)
  • the downloads below
  • balls of steel (actually, I just made that up)
Download

To be ready for the guide, download the following items…

  • the ISO image – DOWNLOAD / MIRRORS COMING SOON MD5: 854bdbb3c5898b15f92b5991204c9288

Once you have this on your machine, you’re ready to start!

The guide

Follow through these steps, one by one and at the end of it you’ll have a rooted Desire with the latest ROM.

Note: This process will wipe your device and there is currently no option to backup your device ROM before you start.

  • Make your microSD card into a goldcard by following these instructions (it’s a good idea to back up the contents of your card first!).
  • Unzip the file you downloaded to a directory, then open a command prompt / terminal window at that directory.
  • Turn off your HTC Desire, then turn it back on with the ‘back’ button held down. You’ll see ‘FASTBOOT’ written on the screen in a red box. Connect the phone to the computer.
  • In the terminal window, enter either (as appropriate, with no quotes)
    ‘step1-windows.bat’
    ‘./step1-mac.sh’
    ‘./step1-linux.sh’
  • When this step has completed, using the optical trackball, navigate to the ‘BOOTLOADER’ and then ‘RECOVERY’ option on the menu, using the volume buttons to move and the power button to select.
  • In the terminal window, enter either (as appropriate, with no quotes):
    ‘step2-windows.bat’
    ‘./step2-mac.sh’
    ‘./step2-linux.sh’
  • When this has completed, your device should be at the ‘recovery’ screen. Select the ‘wipe’ option, then select the option to apply an update zip from sdcard, and select ‘rootedupdate.zip’. This will take a little while, so go make a nice cup of tea. When the flash has finished, reboot, and you are DONE!

Troubleshooting

If you have any issues with the root process, post below, and we’ll do our best to help!

And finally!

If you wish to do so, you can express your appreciation by signing up to a MoDaCo Ad Free or MoDaCo Plus Account using PayPal or Google Checkout, as detailed in this post on MoDaCo
. As well as donating to support the work that goes into all the various MoDaCo activites, you get cool stuff like free software (there’s some great Android stuff coming too!), an ad free MoDaCo site and of course access to the MoDaCo Online Kitchen. All signups are very much appreciated.
Enjoy!

P

Thanks to ChainsDD for his excellent new Superuser Permissions update and Amon_RA for the recovery image I butchered here.

via Modaco.

Enjoy!

UPDATE: An easier guide is now available here!!!

The wait’s finally over, Paul OBrien over at Modaco has finally completed his guide on how to root the HTC Desire.  The instructions are available below.

Note:

  1. I take no responsibility for anything that might go wrong. You do this at your own risk
  2. This method will wipe your phone completely – so backup everything using either SMS Backup Restore/ Call Log Backup Restore / MyBackup Pro / Sprite Backup or any other backup apps available in the market
  3. You need a microSD card to create a goldcard as per the instructions.  At the end of it you won’t be able to use that SD card as a normal memory card.  Don’t use your primary SD card, use a spare, smaller card – even 1GB should suffice
  4. Any problems either post here, in the original Modaco thread (linked above)

Instructions – courtesy of [email protected]:

Read this whole topic – it contains a ton of useful information as well as the instructions and downloads!



Remember that if you use this guide, you do so entirely at your own risk!

Welcome to my guide on how to root the HTC Desire – this is a ‘first cut’ of the guide, and will be refined / improved as time progresses!

Compatibility

This guide will allow you to root your HTC Desire, provided it has a bootloader version of 0.75 or below. To check this, turn off your device, then turn it back on with the ‘back’ key held. On the second line in green text you will see HBOOT- and then a number. Provided this is 0.75 or below, this guide should work for you.

O2 Germany devices are currently shipping with a 0.80 bootloader, and as such cannot be rooted using this guide at this time.

Desire rooting protection< /b>

Back in the early days of Android, rooting was easy. You had several options – you could flash stuff via the bootloader, you could flash an engineering bootloader, you could use kernel exploits – there were many ways of getting the low level access to your device that – in fairness – I think we as paying customers are entitled to. As time has progressed however, the manufacturers have made things harder and harder. The Desire is not a straightforward phone to root, for many reasons, including…

  • a ‘perfected bootloader’ that doesn’t allow flashing or booting of any images (even HTC signed ones)
  • a RUU flash process that does not allow downgrading of the bootloader to earlier versions
  • a kernel (that as yet does not have publicly available source) that as yet has no known exploits
  • a new protection method previously seen on the HTC Tattoo that protects key partitions from having write access. Even with SU access, it is not possible to write to the boot, recovery or system partitions.

In reality, the options for rooting a device this secure are limited. Even if a kernel exploit were found, the key partitions would still be unwritable, rendering su access useless. This was circumvented on the Tattoo very cleverly, using a specific memory address from a confidential Qualcomm datasheet, however this information is not yet available for the Snapdragon chipset used in the Desire (and indeed may never enter the public domain).

And so the root process becomes a process of methodically probing every possible point of exposure on the device, looking for the slightest chink in the armour. I found one and we’re putting it to good use! The downside is that it’s not as easy or as pretty as rooting a device that is actually DESIGNED to be accessible at the lowest level, such as the Nexus One.

Shame on you HTC for going to such unnecessary lengths (but that’s another story for another day).

What this root process provides and does not provide

The root process will…

  • flash your device with a new, generic 1.15.405.4 based ROM that has Superuser access
  • show you how to enter the recovery image in future, allowing you to flash update zips

The root process will NOT…

  • enable you to flash your device with a custom recovery image that can be launched easily by just holding down the volume down button when powering on
  • enable you to have write access to the /system partition in normal use of the device

Both of these limitations are being worked on of course.

Pre-requisites

In order to complete this guide, you need the following…

  • a HTC Desire
  • a Windows machine (sorry, I am trying to remove dependencies on specific OS’)
  • a Linux (a liveCD should do) or OSX machine (sorry, I am trying to remove dependencies on specific OS’)
  • a microUSB cable
  • a microSD card (to be made into a ‘goldcard’)
  • the downloads below
  • balls of steel (actually, I just made that up)

Downloads

To be ready for the guide, download the following items…

  • the ‘test ruu’ – DOWNLOAD / MIRROR – MD5: f1981b26b90b97aea395d2b30909a23f
  • the ‘push files’ – DOWNLOAD / MIRROR– MD5: 9ee301b702078dd1842bd1c67e552f6e
  • the ‘rooted update’ – DOWNLOAD / MIRROR – MD5: 44f2614452ddf777cab9115e2174a91a

Once you have those on your machine, you’re ready to start!

The guide

Follow through these steps, one by one and at the end of it you’ll have a rooted Desire with the latest ROM.

Note: This process will wipe your device and there is currently no option to backup your device ROM before you start

  • Make your microSD card into a goldcard by following these instructions (it’s a good idea to back up the contents of your card first!)
  • Copy the ‘rooted update’ you downloaded above to the root of your SD card, before replacing it into your device.
  • Turn off your HTC desire, then turn it back on with the ‘back’ button held down. You’ll see ‘FASTBOOT’ written on the screen in a red box.
  • Connect the phone to your computer, then run the ‘test ruu’ that you downloaded above (it may take a short while to start). Let the update complete and turn your device off as soon as it reaches the configuration wizard. If you need USB drivers, you can find them as part of the HTC Sync install.
  • Your device should now be off. Unplug the device from your computer. Turn it on again while holding down the ‘volume down’ button this time. The screen will look similar to before, but will say ‘HBOOT’ instead of ‘FASTBOOT’. Use the volume buttons and the power button to select the ‘RECOVERY’ option. You should then see a screen with a red triangle – at this point, plug it into your Linux or OSX computer.
  • Now you need to unzip the ‘push files’ zip that you downloaded above. When you have done so, you’ll see a file called ‘recovery-linux.sh’ or ‘recovery-mac.sh’. Run the one appropriate to your operating system and the screen of your device should change to display the green recovery image menu.
  • In the recovery image (moving around using the optical trackball), select ‘Wipe -> Wipe data /factory reset’ then ‘Flash zip from sdcard’ and choose the rooted update. Confirm with the trackball and the update process will begin. It’ll take a little while, so go make a nice cup of tea.
  • When the flash has finished, reboot, and you are DONE!

Troubleshooting

If you have any issues with the root process, post below, and we’ll do our best to help!

And finally!

If you wish to do so, you can express your appreciation by signing up to a MoDaCo Ad Free or MoDaCo Plus Account using PayPal or Google Checkout, as detailed in this post on MoDaCo.
As well as donating to support the work that goes into all the various MoDaCo activites, you get cool stuff like free software (there’s some great Android stuff coming too!), an ad free MoDaCo site and of course access to the MoDaCo Online Kitchen. All signups are very much appreciated.

Enjoy!

P

Thanks to ChainsDD for his excellent new Superuser Permissions update!

via Modaco

Owners of the HTC Desire on Orange will notice that the Talk (AKA GTalk and Google Talk) is missing from their phone.  I’m guessing this is only to promote their own custom IM application, which has an extra cost attached to it.  Don’t worry though, here’s a quick and easy way to get the application on your Desire.  Just follow the simple steps below:

  1. Download and install Astro File Manager from the Market (if you don’t have it already)
  2. Download the Talk.apk from here
  3. If you downloaded this on your phone skip to Step 4
    If you downloaded this on your computer skip to Step 5
    1. Open Astro file manager
    2. Click on Downloads
    3. Select Talk.apk
    1. Connect your Desire to computer and mount as USB
    2. Copy the Talk.apk file to your phone
    3. Open Astro file manager
    4. Browse to where you’ve put Talk.apk
    5. Select Talk.apk
  4. Select Open App Manager from the two options that appear on Astro
  5. Click Install
  6. Install the application as any normal app.  If you get an Install blocked message, just go to Settings and make sure the Unknown sources box is checked
  7. Open your menu and you should see Talk appear!

The Talk application will sign in automatically (unless you set it not to) and let you talk to any of your GMail contacts via Instant Messenger.  It’s a lot better than other IM apps in the sense that it doesn’t need to keep asking the server if there’s new messages, instead it uses PUSH to get messages to your phone.  This means no extra battery drain and fast notifications!

Thanks to fooby1420 for the original upload.

Google announced a few days ago that Google Maps now allows navigation (as Tweeted by me as soon as I heard).  Here’s an application that will make it a lot easier for you to launch Google Navigation (as well as other services like Maps and Contacts).  It’s just an easier way to start navigating.  Here’s a screenshot of the app:

CarDock by maxitup (click for full size)

To install it follow these simple steps:

  1. Download and install Astro File Manager from the Market (if you don’t have it already)
  2. Download the Nav Launcher from here
  3. If you downloaded this on your phone skip to Step 4
    If you downloaded this on your computer skip to Step 5
    1. Open Astro file manager
    2. Click on Downloads
    3. Select CarDock.apk
    1. Connect your Desire to computer and mount as USB
    2. Copy the CarDock.apk file to your phone
    3. Open Astro file manager
    4. Browse to where you’ve put CarDock.apk
    5. Select CarDock.apk
  4. Select Open App Manager from the two options that appear on Astro
  5. Click Install
  6. Install the application as any normal app.  If you get an Install blocked message, just go to Settings and make sure the Unknown sources box is checked
  7. Open your menu and you should see Car Home appear!

Enjoy!

Thanks to maxitup on XDA-Developers for the original post

Here’s some Internet settings which you can use on your T-Mobile HTC Desire contract to improve your internet connection in case it’s a bit flaky.  Before you start to edit them I’d strongly recommend you write down the original settings in case you want to revert (or if someone is kind enough to post them in comments then even better!)

The settings are as follows:

name= T-mobile Internet
apn= general.t-mobile.uk
username = t-mobile
password= leave it as it is (or set to blank)
mmsc= http://mmsc.t-mobile.co.uk:8002/
mms proxy= 149.254.201.135
mms port= 8080
mmc= 234
mnc= 30
auth= pap

To edit your internet settings go on Settings > Wireless & Network Settings > Mobile Networks > Access Point Names > T-Mobile (or whatever your selected option is) and then enter the above settings in the boxes as they appear.

Thanks to sgtbarton for the heads up!

Update: Please remember this is for T-Mobile UK.
Update 2: Credits given to correct person.  Sorry sgtbarton!

Before I get into this I want to make one thing clear: it’s not bad to have a task killer installed for the purpose of checking what’s running or to close unnecessary apps, but if you have it make sure the task killer itself isn’t running in the background.

Ok, so a lot of people with their new Desire have been recommended to install a task killer.  Here’s a few reasons why you don’t need one:

  1. The way Android OS works is that when an app is in the background then it’s as if the app is frozen and not really running.  The exception being apps that need to run in the background such as feed readers, Twitter clients and so on.  Having apps in the background that aren’t doing anything is therefore not a problem.  The ones that are (Peep, Stocks and so on) you can just change their update frequency to something higher so they’re not running as often.
  2. The memory management of Android makes sure you always have sufficient free memory. If the available memory falls below a certain threshold your phone will automatically close older applications.  Even though this wasn’t too efficient on the Hero, it’s far better on the Desire which has more initial memory to work with.
  3. Task Killers themselves use up system resources constantly and in turn use battery life, not to mention that it’s trying to access ALL the other processes.  Many users have reported an increase in battery life when they don’t have a Task Killer running
  4. Some task killers will make Sense laggy.  Lagginess is a common complaint from Task Killer users.  It keeps trying to access the Sense process and causes it to lag.
  5. Certain apps restart anyway.  HTC Apps like Stocks, Peep and Footprint will restart themselves whenever they’re closed.  This restart process might cause your phone to lag for a second, use up extra battery during the initialisation process, and so obviously closing such apps has done more bad than good.
  6. The Desire actually has enough memory and processing power to handle many applications being open.  If it’s not broke then don’t fix it, right?

If you insist on having one installed then make sure it’s not always running.  When you select apps to close, make sure the task killer itself is included.

One of the main complaints about Desire users is the battery finishing quickly.  From smartphone experience, I’d say ideal battery life on any smartphone (which obviously the Desire is) is about a day.  That’s to say if you need to charge your battery every night then it’s pretty standard.  This isn’t your standard phone which might play a few MP3s, receive a few calls and possibly view a couple of low-quality webpages on a small browser.  No, the Desire is a powerhouse full of emails, full web browsing, media playing, wireless connections, navigation, high quality video playback, gaming and a whole lot more!

If your battery is getting drained a lot quicker than that, then here’s a good few tips on how to make it last to the end of the day:

  1. Remove your Task Killer.  Seriously, the Desire doesn’t NEED one and I’ll be writing up another post about them after this to explain in detail why.  If you do want to use one, make sure it isn’t always running in the background.
  2. Turn of Mobile Data when not in use.  The phone uses a lot of internet functions, whether it’s checking email, syncing contacts, GTalk or checking for tweets.  To be able to do it all properly it needs an active Internet connection.  When there’s no mobile internet coverage it will REGULARLY check to see if there’s coverage available.  If you know you’re in a location without mobile internet, do your battery a favour and turn the Mobile Data off to prevent those checks, then enable it again when you’re leaving.
    To do this go on Settings > Wireless & Networks > Mobile networks > Use only 2G networks
  3. Disable GPS – if you’re not using it then there’s no need to keep it on is there?
  4. Screen brightness – this one’s a tricky one.  With the AMOLED screen you do need it turned up quite bright to view outdoors.  But if you’re indoors then a lower brightness shouldn’t a be a problem.  I normally keep my phone set to Auto-brightness – to enable go on Settings > Sound & Display > Brightness > Automatic brightness.  Even with auto-brightness enabled I can get to the end of the day with 30-40% battery remaining.
  5. Remove unnecessary widgets.  Whilst they look very nice, widgets can use up a lot of battery.  Try removing some that you can live without.
  6. Use Wireless for browsing – yup, if you’re planning on using the Internet for an extended period of time whether it’s normal browsing, or watching BeebPlayer or YouTube, it’s actually preferred if you have a wireless connection rather than using mobile internet.   The bonus is you get a much better browsing/viewing experience too!

Extra Tips

Use a widget to easily toggle settings.  Even though I’ve listed the entry in Settings to change those settings, a lot can easily be handled using widgets or apps.  I normally use MySettings which you can open using the notification bar, and it allows quick toggles of: Mobile Data On/Off, Silent/Loud, WiFi On/Off, GPS On/Off, Bluetooth On/Off, AutoSync On/Off, Auto Rotate On/Off, Screen Timeout, Brightness Level, Unlock Pattern

You can monitor which activities are actually using up your battery.  Have a look under Settings > About phone > Battery Use to see what’s being taking the toll on the battery.  It’s normally Display, Standby and Voice Calls for me.

The main ones are Mobile Networks and GPS, but all the above tweaks will improve your battery life!

Feedback

It’d be great to hear other peoples tips too, and hopefully I can extend this list.  If you want to contribute either leave a comment or email hello [at] myhtcdesire [dot] com.  Thanks!

If you’re new to Android, or to smartphones then the Desire might seem a little overwhelming when you first get it.  Here’s a few tips and tricks on what to do when you get your phone, and how to use the Sense interface properly:

  • check that Internet and MMS are working. You might need to contact your network provider for the settings to use.
  • Add my email accounts to the Mail app – remembering to turn the “Sent from Hero” signature off. You can leave that on to brag but I don’t think it looks good when I’m emailing clients!
  • Setup your WiFi
  • Press Menu on the Home Screen, from the scene’s option choose the blank one and then add the widgets that you actually want/need. Extras will only drain the battery faster though they might provide extra eye-candy when you’re showing off your phone.
  • You can hold your finger down in any empty space on a homescreen to quickly add widgets.
  • Long-pressing an application in the menu will let you add it as a shortcut to a homescreen
  • Long-pressing the Home button will list your recently launched apps.
  • Pinch a homescreen, (or press Home whilst already on a homescreen) to see an overview of all 7 homescreens.
  • To use a part of an MP3 as a ringtone, open the track in the Music player, press Menu and select “Set as Ringtone”, then select “Trim the ringtone” and from there you can select and preview which part of the song you want!

Closing Applications

There’s no such thing as closing an app on an Android device because they’re multi-tasking phones. You simply press the home button to leave it and it should carry on where you left it next time you go on. When your device finds that it’s running out of RAM it’ll start closing the older apps itself.